advertising

The BUY UP Index rates companies on how they serve women as leaders, employees and consumers.

Not all tech is alike. Those phones, tablets, desktops and laptops that we use everyday--we perceive and relate to each device almost as if each were a different type of person. Guess which one is like a lover?

Advertising messages are full of stereotypes - for both women and men. Many commercials and ads create a very negative picture of masculinity. Men are taught not to express their emotions, to be dishonest, and to remain isolated from others.

If there's a place in hell for women who don't help one another, there should be a place in heaven for men who promote women's equality. Or so say our friends over at the 3% Movement.

Leave it up to a person who doesn't have breasts, a vagina or fallopian tubes to design a smart bra meant to only unhook for your true love. Japanese lingerie company Ravijour is marking its 10th year with The True Love Tester Bra because "women will always seek true love."

At the Super Bowl, the ads are as much of a show as the game itself. The 3% Conference and The Representation Project are organizing tweet-up parties across the country to talk ads. It's a chance for the masses to grade the advertising business--and tell them how they're doing.

Nobody likes to be put into a stereotype. Women have long suffered the cliches of modern advertising, but a therapist concerned about men's emotional health feels that stereotypes of masculinity are hurting men--and society.

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