education

It takes months of preparing, testing, applications to get into college. Now acceptances have gone out, how can you choose which college is the best for you? It turns out women might want to ask some different questions.

This fall, an estimated 12 million women will enroll in college. The number of women students surpassed men in 1980, and the gap has been widening ever since. Since 2011, more working women have held college degrees than working men. Of the 80 highest ranked schools in the country, here is a roundup of some of the best colleges for women.

Barbie is getting a wardrobe change. How does a scientist who studies comets and planets in our solar system get in the business of selling dolls? She is on a mission and it involves dolls and making it possible to see some change.

Despite the illustrious company of Hillary Clinton, Melinda Gates, Lady GaGa, and Barbara Streisand, the teenage Afghani stole the show. Not only is she a hero (and martyr), Malala is also a master of the pen.
Games are the second most used online application after social media and can be an entry into tech. Girl Scouts kicked off a new self-guided program, called “Be The Video Game Developer.” Girls can create media instead of passively consuming it.

The new iPad app may be just part of the equation to get more girls interested in STEM fields. Designed with girls aged 8 and up in mind, the app uses a simple interface to teach kids how to code.

Often the latest movies only come to big cities, but "Girl Rising", a fascinating new film showcasing the trials nine girls from nine different countries go through in pursuit of an education, is playing in 169 different towns nationwide.
Nobel Peace Prize nominee and education activist Malala Yousafzai has begun her first day at her new school in the UK. The 15 year-old considers it "the most important day" of her life.

An infographic from the website College.com examines the fact that in higher education these days, it's a woman's world. By 2019, there will be nearly three female students for every two male students in college, according to the National Center for Education Statistics. The graphic postulates that this will be a problem for male employment down the line, since unemployment rates are higher for people without college degrees. View the full infographic after the jump.

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