executives

VITAMIN W has completed a study on the banking sector which is presented in three parts.

A new report from the University of California, Davis, Gradiate School of Management finds that women hold fewer than 10% of the highest-paid executive positions and board seats in the state. What's more, there has been little improvement in this rate over the years. The seventh annual study saw just a 0.2% annual improvement in the rate of California women who hold these top positions. According to the report, "The proportion of women who lead California’s largest companies is growing at such a slow pace that it will take more than a century for women business leaders to achieve parity with men."
Jill Abramson, the first woman executive editor of the New York Times, says that "The idea that women journalists bring a different taste in stories or sensibility isn't true." But some newspaper veterans disagree. For instance, Ann Marie Lipinski, who in 2001 became the first female editor of the Chicago Tribune, says, "Do I think gender plays a role in that case? I suspect at times it does. Being a woman gives you access to some experiences in life that men don't have, just as the reverse is true."
Clinical psychologist Leslie Pratch discusses the role self-confidence may play in the success of women executives. "For women, the ability to identify and face difficulties in the external world openly and non-defensively predicted leadership beyond any chance occurrence," she writes. "The correlation between self-confidence and leadership effectiveness was also overwhelmingly statistically significant."